My Father…

…is dying and all I can think is that I have to get home and preserve his library.

I’m a librarian.  It’s what I DO.

I simply can’t do the hysterical, Bertha Mason, Victorian melodrama type crap.

That’s not what I DO.

Sorry World but that ain’t the way I roll.

I don't do this

I don’t do this

200px-CassandraAusten-JaneAusten(c.1810)_hires

 

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One Response to “My Father…”

  1. warriet Says:

    go for it Louise,. F the world, my mother is dying although current prognosis is that she will make her 93rd birthday next month. I too am not going to be at all over-wrought/melodramatic – my role at the moment is to visit those afternoons/evenings when my sisters cannot make it. Mother is dipping in and out of lucidity but as she granted an EPA to my sisters more than a decade ago there is no debate about where next after hospital. Each time I have been to visit, I have reasserted that going back to her own extra support LA flat is not an option – she has already demonstrated that she is not fit to look after herself any more and that she is a clear danger to herself and others.. Gosh doesn’t that all sound a bit harsh but not at all:L she has made all her dispositions including to deliver the eulogy to tell the gathered throng that her life had been a lot more than that of a cranky old lady. That she was an active soldier during WWII WOII (as high as you can get without being commissioned). She was very relieved when Germany surrendered – they could deal with V1s but all ere very alarmed by V2s which could destroy wherever they hit and since the descent was a faster than speed of sound parabola dictated by basic physics against which there was no defence – they had to be destroyed at launch. Not that her war ended on VE or VJ day ; she was given a field commission so that she could chaperone the Major charged with the welfare of displaced Latvian families marooned in refugee camps while the husbands and fathers fought in the British forces.. That was all quite depressing really because everyone know that Stalin had decreed that anyone who had fought for anyone except his Red Army so hey did not want to go home. Katyn was an apparent secret but everyone knew/ and feared what fate awaited them and their children. And so on.

    Sorry for going on just that the imminent death of my surviving parent is a bit to the forefront at the moment.

    Go and sort out his library hopefully while your father is still alive enough to appreciate the fact that his books will be looked after by one of his own who just happens to be a trained librarian. This country is so screwed up by death that the population in general just won’t talk about let alone acknowledge just how sensible(pun intended) your book-sorting will be.

    JFDI! (which was going to be the name of my new radio programme but RTFM seems to have stuck.

    And of course sympathies and condolences from me to you: library sorting reads to me to be a far more effective tribute to your father and his life…

    if you want to talk about it all to someone who can listen and who is not scared by raw emotion (except my own of course) you can phone me on 07804884521 at more or less any time

    David

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